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Calendar
The Decline Of The Industry Continued
After Nationalisation 1947

Book 6
Chimneys
1987
1990
1992

1990 Pages   1     2     3     4     5     6     7     8     9  

1990 - Page 7


Shireoaks / Steetley Closed After 130 Years

- Continued -


Output and Manpower:

  • 1949: 160,000 tons, 442/89, total 531 men
  • 1950: 175,000 tons, 436/100, total 536 men
  • 1955: 845 TH, 216 s/f
  • 1960: 464 TH, 159 s/f
  • 1965: 428 u/g, 160 s/f
  • 1970: 473 u/g, 169 s/f

Fatal Accidents Shireoaks

FATAL ACCIDENT AT SHIREOAKS COLLIERY, NEAR WORKSOP.We regret to inform our readers that a most melancholy accident occurred at the pit, which is now being sunk at Shireoaks. On Monday afternoon, about half-past two o'clock, five men, named John Ward, John Lilleyman, Thomas Whittaker, Jesse Webster, and George Whittaker, were at work sinking the shaft at eighty yards below the surface. It appears there was a tramway from the pit mouth to what is called the pit bank, which latter is composed of accumulations of strata excavated from the pit. Isaac Camshall was the “Banksman” on the occasion, and having emptied the sinking tub, previously “scotching” the wheel of the tram-waggon, he turned round to the blacksmith to give him directions about some work, and on looking round, almost immediately, he observed the waggon just on the pit's mouth, the “scotch” having got out of its place. The waggon fell down the shaft, and dashed Ward to pieces. The lower part of his back-bone protruded through his skin at least a foot. All his bones appeared to be thoroughly broken, and, of course, life was extinct, George Whitaker was seriously, but not dangerously wounded. The others almost miraculously escaped unhurt. Mr. W. L. Beardsall, surgeon of Worksop, was immediately sent for, and was promptly on the spot .The remains of the unfortunate man were shortly afterwards conveyed to his home in Worksop. An inquest was held on the following day before William Newton, Esq., at the house of Mr. P. Marshall, the Greyhound Inn, when Messrs. Samuel Seale, Isaac Camshall, Solomon Hewitt, T. L. Beardsall and others, were sworn and gave evidence relative to the above melancholy catastrophe. All the witnesses spoke to the sobriety and good conduct of Camshall. After mature deliberation the jury returned a verdict of accidental death. Ward has left a wife near her confinement and a numerous family totally un-provided for. At the request of the jury, the coroner cautioned the overseers at the pit to use every possible precaution so as to prevent accidents in future.

Bernie Ayton
Shireoaks

  • John Ward, sinker killed, wagon fell down shaft 12/11/1855 (See also Alan Beales Fatality List)
  • Another sinker ? in Nov 1856 when the shaft side collapsed
  • William Barker killed and Thomas Waterhouse (?) (died 31/1/1857) when hoppit was drawn into winding sheaves 6/1/1857, 3 sinkers fell into the pit bottom off the sinking scaffold
  • Thomas Peters (29) died from his injuries on 5/8/1859 after a bucket carrying bricks caught the side and fell onto him 4/8/1859
  • - Booth (22) 1/10/1860
  • Joseph Leadbetter (22) 6/10/1860
  • David Moore (23) 6/10/1860
  • Thomas Lunn (..?) 10/6/1863
  • Jesse Webster (39) 15/11/1863
  • Richard Jones (35) and John Allison (..?) 21/12/1865
  • Charles Fletcher (12) 27/4/1868
  • Peter Moakes (..?) 20/12/1868
  • J Smallcombe (..?) 20/4/1869
  • Thomas Wilkinson (27) 20/3/1872
  • Luke Woodward (35) 5/11/1872
  • Joshua Espinstall (44) 5/2/1873
  • Sam Spriggs (21) 9/1/1874
  • Alfred Booker (..?) 18/9/1874
  • George Shay (46) 10/5/1877
  • Alick Hunt (16) 15/6/1882
  • Oliver Clay (19) Screenhand, lowering wagons with a scotch 13/5/1896 (Manager John Jones, Mines Inspector WH Hepplewhite, inquest held at Station Hotel, Worksop)
  • Francis Stenton (18) pony driver, badly injured at 11.30am on 11/10/1919, died 9 days later, 20/10/1919, J Hall HMI attended the scene
  • George William Green (30) Shaftsman on top of the chair was killed by falling corroded bricks, injured on 22/12/1930, died 27/12/1930
  • Frank Storey (16) run over by tubs 4/5/1934
  • Sam Heaton (58) run over by tubs 8/8/1935
  • George Arthur Seaman (15) coal fell from a conveyor and struck him 28/9/1936
  • Benjamin Nixon (33) and George Cheetham (16) were gassed 2/6/1938
  • Thomas Womble (51) fall of coal 8/5/1939 T-Womble
  • Albert Edward Mee (36) fall of roof 2/5/1939 died 6/5/1939
  • John William Beardmore (55) fall of roof 4/1/1942
  • George Leslie Pinchin (19) fall of roof 6/5/1942
  • George Edward Staniland (36) fall of roof 8/1/1943
  • Willis Stocks (48) knocked into the sump by tubs 3/6/1947
  • Patrick King (59) run over by tubs 21/12/1949
  • Charles Watkinson (51) fall of coal 15/12/1953
  • James Frederick Richardson (33) fall of roof 5/4/1955
  • William Arthur Towle (48) crushed by a loco on the surface 30/8/1955
  • Albert Edward Dove (42) fall of roof 20/6/1957
  • Arthur Nelson (54) fall of coal 7/7/1958
  • Derek Stafford (38) crushed by an hydraulic face support 24/7/1968
  • George Ellis (51) fall of roof 21/6/1972
  • Geoffrey Mould (20) Plant driver crushed by bulldozer on surface 1/6/1974, died 14/6/1974
Tony Anthony David Burridge (28) fall of roof, died 25/08/1988

Collieries Merged 1983.

  • Steetley No1 DC shaft 190 feet above sea level, depth 599 Yards (547.7m), position 43/5578/200478.
  • Whitwell No2 shaft 43/5375/410764, 582 yards (532m) deep.

Seams worked at Steetley:

  • Top Hard 3, 4” (1.0m) start 1877 and worked to 1/1/1961.
  • High Hazel coal 6” (0.15m), dirt 1” (0.02m), coal 2’ 10” (0.86m). Methane drainage practised.

Manpower: Steetly:

  • 1894: 371 Top Hard, 75 s/f
  • 1895: 360 TH, 71 s/f
  • 1896: 340 TH, 70 s/f
  • 1897: 313 TH, 80 s/f
  • 1898: 291 TH, 68 s/f
  • 1899: 293 TH, 63 s/f
  • 1900: 303 TH, 60 s/f
  • 1901: 321 TH, 73 s/f
  • 1902: 355 TH, 62 s/f
  • 1903: 353 TH, 73 s/f
  • 1905: 405 TH, 77 s/f
  • 1906: 394 TH, 73 s/f
  • 1907: 399 TH, 69 s/f
  • 1908: 361 TH, 77 s/f
  • 1909: 342 TH, 70 s/f
  • 1910: 340 TH, 72 s/f
  • 1911: 338 TH, 73 s/f
  • 1912: 293 TH, 75 s/f

1913: Steetley: 285 TH, 71 s/f

  • 1914: 270 TH, 71 s/f
  • 1915: 171 TH, 66 s/f
  • 1916: 177 TH, 63 s/f
  • 1917: 159 TH, 50 s/f
  • 1918: 144 TH, 51 s/f
  • 1919: 132 TH, 51 s/f
  • 1920: 144 TH, 52 s/f
  • 1921: 188 TH, 55 s/f
  • 1922: 236 TH, 59 s/f
  • 1923: 466 TH, 70 s/f
  • 1924: 511 TH, 74 s/f
  • 1925: 476 TH, 77 s/f
  • 1926: 410 TH, 74 s/f
  • 1927: 503 TH, 81 s/f
  • 1928: 343 TH, 67 s/f
  • 1929: 416 TH, 69 s/f
  • 1930: 470 TH, 80 s/f
  • 1931: 459 TH, 77 s/f
  • 1932: 486 TH, 77 s/f
  • 1933: 490 TH, 77 s/f
  • 1934: 442 TH, 77 s/f
  • 1935: 442 TH, 78 s/f
  • 1936: 516 TH, 81 s/f
  • 1937: 551 TH, 79 s/f
  • 1938: 584 TH, 90 s/f
  • 1939: 500 app TH, 88 s/f
  • 1940: 475 TH, 87 s/f
  • 1941: 459 TH, 79 s/f
  • 1942: 529 TH, 91 s/f
  • 1943: 521 TH, 91 s/f
  • 1944: 488 TH, 93 s/f
  • 1945: 477 TH, 90 s/f
  • 1946: 450 TH, 100 s/f

NCB:

  • 1947: 404 TH, 109s/f
  • 1955: 381 TH, 98 s/f
  • 1960: 374 TH, 100 s/f
  • 1965: 365 u/g, 111 s/f
  • 1970: 378 u/g, 110 s/f

Tonnages Steetley:

  • 1963: 191,000 tons, profit
  • 1963/64: 180,000 tons, profit
  • 1964/65: 202,000 tons, loss
  • 1965/66: 267,000 tons, profit
  • 1966/67: 297.000 tons, profit
  • 1967/68: 344,000 tons
  • 1968/69: 321,000 tons
  • 1969/70: 320,000 tons
  • 1970/71: 337,000 tons
  • 1971/72: 293,000 tons
  • 1972/73: 398,000 tons
  • 1973/74: 312,000 tons
  • 1974/75: 337,000 tons
  • 1975/76: 380,000 tonnes, profit £1.624m
  • 1976/77: 312,000 tonnes
  • 1977/78: 332,000 tonnes
  • 1978/79: 378,000 tonnes
  • 1979/80: 336,000 tonnes
  • 1980/81: 313,000 tonnes.