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Inquest Reports - Kirkby Colliery

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Kirkby Colliery - Page 1

Inquest Reports From Newspapers
Re Nottinghamshire Fatal Accidents


Nottinghamshire Guardian Saturday 16 April 1895


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The adjourned inquest on the body of Frederick Moore, twenty,  of Byron Street, Kirkby, was held on Tuesday afternoon, at the Public Mortuary, Eastcroft, Nottingham. It transpired at the opening of the inquiry on Tuesday the 27th March, that deceased worked at the Kirkby Colliery, and on Friday the 22nd ult, whilst he and some other men were at the bottom of the shaft fixing some timber in the cage the latter was suddenly raised and deceased was dragged up along with it, but fell when he had got to a considerable height, and was so severely injured he had to be taken to the Nottingham General Hospital where he died. Thomas Sanders, Lowmoor Road, East Kirkby, “on-setter” at the Kirkby pit, now said that his duty was to look after the pit bottom and give the necessary signal when the cage was ready to be raised. On Friday 22nd March, he was helping to load the cage with timber, and whilst on the top of the cage the latter was raised. The button of the electric signal projected about an inch from the wall, and he thought it possible for one of the men to have pushed against it whilst moving the timber. By Mr. Hepplewhite: When he got on to the top of the cage Spowage was inside. Part of the wood projected over the side of the cage and as it went up it caught on the shrouding and rocked the cage. The Coroner said it appeared to him that the electric bell might have been accidentally touched, and there was the possibility that as the button of the electric bell stood out from the post, and was just the height of a man’s shoulders. It was quite within the bounds of possibility that somebody touched the button without knowing it, and so caused the cage to be raised. The jury returned a verdict that deceased ha died from injuries received by falling from the cage, which was raised in response to a signal accidentally given to the engine driver, and recommended that the electric bell should be protected in future.


Inquest Reports - Lodge Colliery, Newthorpe


Nottinghamshire Guardian Friday 17 November 1882

On Wednesday afternoon Me. Arthur Browne, Deputy County Coroner, held an inquest at the Miners Rest Inn, Newthorpe, concerning the death of Samuel Limb. Of Newthorpe Common, aged twenty two, a collier. The first witness was William Limb, brother of the deceased, who identified him and spoke as to his age. Joseph Limb stated that he worked with deceased at the Lodge Colliery, Newthorpe, in the parish of Greasley. On Monday morning he was making a shot hole to blast the coal, and deceased was building a pack with stones to support the roof. Whilst they were so engaged a quantity of the bind of the roof fell, the weight being about two or three tons. It struck the deceased upon the head and forced him upon the pack he was building crushing his head. Witness and a man named William Clifton went to the assistance of the deceased, but some more bind fell before they could extricate him. He was then dead. There were two props about a yard from the deceased. They were of about the usual thickness and strength. In witness’s opinion there was quite sufficient timber about; there was more in the gate which might have been used if necessary. The bind must have slipped and forced the props to one side. Witness had a very narrow escape, some of the bind striking him. A deputy under-viewer was on the spot half an hour before deceased was killed. David Hall, deputy under-viewer, spoke as to the examination which he made of the colliery on Monday morning. He went to the place were deceased was killed, and found it to all appearances quite safe. He noticed the timber, and found three or four props about a yard from the face of the wall. There appeared to be plenty of timber, and the men could always have it when they required it. The jury returned a verdict of “Accidental death”.


Inquest Reports - New Hucknall, Newthorpe


Nottinghamshire Guardian Friday 31 March 1882

memory

An inquest was held on Thursday, at Hucknall under Huthwaite by Mr. D. Whittingham, the District Coroner, on the body of William Hartwell, collier, who died on the 21st instant, from injuries received on February 13th. It appeared from the evidence that deceased was at work in the New Hucknall pit on the date in question, when about a hundredweight of bind fell on him from the roof. He was promptly extricated, but sustained such severe injuries as to cause his death. Every precaution was apparently taken by management to prevent accident. A verdict of “Accidental death” was returned”.


Nottinghamshire Guardian Friday 23 June 1882

memory

An inquest was held on Friday afternoon at the Maplewell’s Inn, Sutton in Ashfield, by Mr. Arthur Browne, deputy coroner, on the body of George Shooter, aged fifty five, collier, who was killed in the New Hucknall Colliery on Wednesday. The Coroner explained that the circumstances of the case were simple, and the Inspector of Mines had communicated with him to the effect that his attendance was not necessary, so the enquiry would not be adjourned. A jury of thirteen being sworn, the first witness called was Frederick Tufnell, who stated that he was the engine driver at the New Hucknall Colliery. The deceased’s occupation was that of screening coal and attending to the “smudge” waggon. About four o clock on Wednesday afternoon, witness saw deceased “scotching” waggons and filling them with coal. No one was working close to the deceased. Witness afterwards was proceeding along the line when he noticed that two of them mounted on the line as if passing over a “scotch”. He immediately stopped the engine to see what was the matter, and found the deceased lying across the rails. Witness saw that he had been run over, and ran to the office for assistance. The deceased was found to be quite dead. There was a sufficient quantity of timber which was set about four feet apart, but if they required more they would have been able to get it very quickly. No warning was given by the bind before it fell. Witness was a stallman in the stall in which deceased was working who was in his charge. He had to keep the gate road in repair and there was a prop near the piece of bind which fell but not actually under it. It was about four feet long, a yard wide and about nine inched thick. Witness did not try the piece of bind which fell on Thursday. Two under-viewers had passed through the stall on Wednesday and examined it. They did not say anything about it being dangerous. Deceased was a little deaf. Samuel Tidswell, of Skegby, collier, said on Thursday last he was working in the next stall to the deceased and last witness when he heard someone call for help went into the stall where deceased was employed and found a quantity of bind had fallen upon him. With assistance of last witness he was got out but was quite dead. Henry Phillips of Sutton said he was deputy under-viewer at the New Hucknall Colliery. He examined No 28 stall in which deceased was employed about ten thirty on Thursday morning. He found it sufficiently timbered and in safe working order. Witness tried the roof with his stick, and it appeared quite safe. Deceased had been working in the colliery for about four or five months past, he was employed as a loader and had nothing to do with the timbering or roofing. There were two props still standing, and the bind that fell broke through between them. Witness thought it perfectly safe, but if it had been thought dangerous another prop would have been put under it. May Mellors of Nottingham, said she was the sister of the deceased whose name was Joseph McQuinn, single, aged twenty five. He had been a farm labourer up to a little before Christmas, when he became a collier. Witness did not consider him deaf, but had not seen him since Christmas. The jury returned a verdict of “Accidental death”.


Nottingham Daily Express Monday 05 March 1883

memory

On Saturday the Deputy Coroner Mr A Browne, held an inquest at the New Cross Inn, Sutton in Ashfield, on the body of Joseph McQuinn, aged twenty five years, who was killed by a fall of roof at the New Hucknall Colliery, on Thursday last. Joseph Kinsey, of Hucknall Huthwaite Colliery, said he was working with deceased at the New Hucknall Colliery on Thursday afternoon last, in No 28 stall. Witness was holing. Deceased was working about four yards away from where witness was, and had just turned a tub around with one hand, when witness heard something fall. Witness shouted to deceased, and saw his lamp was out, and at once went to see what the matter was, he found that a quantity of bind had fallen on to the deceased in a solid piece. He tried to get deceased from under but was unable to do so. When he called for assistance, deceased was got out, quite dead.

There was a sufficient quantity of timber which was set about four feet apart, but if they required more they would have been able to get it very quickly. No warning was given by the bind before it fell. Witness was a stallman in the stall in which deceased was working who was in his charge. He had to keep the gate road in repair and there was a prop near the piece of bind which fell but not actually under it. It was about four feet long, a yard wide and about nine inched thick. Witness did not try the piece of bind which fell on Thursday. Two under-viewers had passed through the stall on Wednesday and examined it. They did not say anything about it being dangerous. Deceased was a little deaf. Samuel Tidswell, of Skegby, collier, said on Thursday last he was working in the next stall to the deceased and last witness when he heard someone call for help went into the stall where deceased was employed and found a quantity of bind had fallen upon him. With assistance of last witness he was got out but was quite dead. Henry Phillips of Sutton said he was deputy under-viewer at the New Hucknall Colliery. He examined No 28 stall in which deceased was employed about ten thirty on Thursday morning. He found it sufficiently timbered and in safe working order. Witness tried the roof with his stick, and it appeared quite safe. Deceased had been working in the colliery for about four or five months past, he was employed as a loader and had nothing to do with the timbering or roofing. There were two props still standing, and the bind that fell broke through between them. Witness thought it perfectly safe, but if it had been thought dangerous another prop would have been put under it. May Mellors of Nottingham, said she was the sister of the deceased whose name was Joseph McQuinn, single, aged twenty five. He had been a farm labourer up to a little before Christmas, when he became a collier. Witness did not consider him deaf, but had not seen him since Christmas. The jury returned a verdict of “Accidental death”.


Nottinghamshire Guardian Friday 18 July 1884

memory

On Wednesday the Deputy Coroner held an inquest at the Duke of Sussex Inn, Fulwood, Sutton in Ashfield, upon the body of Arthur Keeton, aged sixteen, who had died from injuries received in the New Hucknall Colliery on Monday. Mr. Stokes, Assistant Inspector of Mines, was present, and Mr. Watson, was in attendance on behalf of the Company. Frederic Keeton identified the body. He last saw deceased alive on Monday morning at half pas six o’ clock, when he left home to go to work at the pit. He was brought home dead between nine and ten o’clock. Deceased was employed as a horse driver. Witness had no complaint to make against anyone, and believed the occurrence was a pure accident. William Hoyland, a youth living at Fulwood, said he was a driver at the New Hucknall Colliery, and knew the deceased, who was also engaged as a driver in the pit. On Monday morning he saw deceased in charge of a pony and three empty tubs going to stall No 45. Witness in about twenty five minutes afterwards went up to the stall to find the corporal, and saw deceased lying beneath the first of three loaded tubs in the middle of the gate. He had come through the door, from which the last tub was about four yards. When he went with the empty tubs deceased would prop the door open and on returning it was allowed to shut by itself. It was usual when returning with full tubs for the driver to hold the door open until the horse had got partly through, and then close. When he first saw deceased he had a lighted lamp, but on afterwards discovering him he was in the dark. Witness went for assistance and his father came. Deceased was taken from under the tram and removed home. By Mr. Stokes: Deceased had three full tubs with him when he found him. They were not allowed to ride on the full tubs, and he had not heard of deceased doing so. The pony which deceased had charge off kicked and bit, but he had heard him say he would sooner drive it than any other animal. Johnathan Hoyland, father of the last witness, deposed to finding deceased who was quite dead when he got up to him. He found his lamp extinguished on the side of the road, just opposite his hand, and about a quarter of a yard away. The gradient on this road was not very great. In reply to Mr. Stokes, witness stated that none of the tubs had left the road. Deceased did not appear to have been dragged any distance. From the position in which he had found him he did not appear to have been riding on the limmers. The state of the road was good and there was sufficient room for some yards near the gate for the deceased to have walked and then got in front of his horse. Thomas Moore, the corporal, also gave evidence, and in answer to Mr. Stokes, said he did not think that there was sufficient space near the door, if the trucks had been in motion, for deceased to have passed in safety. It would have been dangerous for him to run by the side of the truck in order for him to reach the horse’s head after he had been attending to the door. He attributed the accident to deceased having dropped his lamp and in endeavouring to recover it he was run over by the tubs. The Coroner having briefly reviewed the evidence, a juror who had worked in several pits, said that in his opinion much neglect was generally shown in the keeping of roads clear from rubbish. The Coroner said that if the road in question was not sufficient for the drivers to pass with safety no doubt the Company would do all that was necessary in the matter. The jury returned a verdict of “Accidental death”


Nottinghamshire Guardian Friday 14 September 1883

memory

The district coroner, Mr. D. Whittingham, held an inquest on Monday afternoon at the Old Trooper Inn, Sutton in Ashfield, concerning the death of George Berry, whose death was caused by the fall of some bind upon him in the New Hucknall coal mine. George Goodall, stocking weaver, of Sutton, said the deceased was his stepson, and was twenty two years of age. The deceased had worked at the New Hucknall Colliery. Witness last saw him alive last Friday night, and he was taken home dead on Saturday morning. John Wright, collier, stated that last Saturday morning he was at work in No 8 stall of the New Hucknall pit. He and the deceased went down together about five o clock, and worked in the same stall. The deceased was employed in building a pack, and while he was going a short distance off to get a wedge a large piece of bind, weighing between two and three tons fell upon him and killed him. There was plenty of timber in the pit, and witness never had to complain of the want of it. The bind fell away in one piece. The accident could not have been prevented by extra precautions. The bind fell a little lower down the road than where the pack was situated. In answer to Mr. Evans, the witness said he had examined the stall with a light. A shot was fired in that part of the pit ion Friday night, but not on the morning of the accident. Fred Hardy, collier, said he was within twenty yards of the deceased at the time of the accident. There were four props between the road and the pack and two in the centre of the road. He considered that the roof was sufficiently supported. The roof was tested and it seemed secure. William Pemberton, deputy underviewer deposed he had examined the stall in question on Friday night and found it safe. About half past six o clock on Saturday morning he saw the bind that had fallen. None of the colliers made any complaint to him about the roof. On the previous night the roof was well supported. A verdict of “Accidental death” was returned.
Nottinghamshire Guardian Friday 27 February 1885.


memory

On Friday an inquest was held at the Blue Bell Inn, Sutton in Ashfield, by Mr. D. Whittingham, District Coroner, touching the death of John Charles Price, who died on the previous day. Mr. S. Watson certified manager to the New Hucknall Colliery watched the proceedings. Samuel Price, father of the deceased, having identified the body, stated that he was seventeen years of age, and had worked at the colliery as a banksman for six or seven months, Deceased never complained of any danger attending his work. He went to work on the previous morning, and brought home at night dead. Francis Corden, fireman, said that about half past three o’ clock he saw the deceased in a railway truck on the colliery siding. The truck was empty and was attached to several full ones, with two empty ones behind. The wagons were in motion when witness first saw them. He stood about twenty yards away. The deceased seemed to overbalance himself, and fell over the truck side. A wall ran along the side of the rails, and deceased seemed to pitch against the wall and fall back on to the rails. Witness gave an instant alarm, and the wagons were stopped. Only one truck went over the youth, but when witness got up to him he was dead. William Boole, bank manager at the colliery said it was the deceased’s duty to help in loading the trucks with coal at the filling platform, and he had no right to ride on the trucks. He had previously cautioned the deceased as well as others about this practice. There was nothing on the line that would cause the deceased to be shaken from the truck. The jury returned a verdict that the lad was “Accidently killed” and at the same time informed Mr. Watson the manager, that measures should be taken to prevent boys riding on the trucks. Mr Watson said the matter had already been taken in hand.


Nottinghamshire Guardian Friday 08 January 1886

memory

On Saturday afternoon an inquest was held at the Staff of Life Inn, Sutton in Ashfield, by Mr. D. Whittingham, the district coroner, upon the death of Joseph Hames, who had met with his death whilst, engaged at the New Hucknall Colliery. Mr. S. Watson was present representing the company. Hannah Hames, living at Sutton in Ashfield, stated that the deceased was her husband. He was forty five years of age, and a collier at the New Hucknall Colliery, where he had been employed for nearly five years. Deceased went to work as usual shortly after six o’ clock on Thursday morning, and he was brought home dead about noon. William Marshall, collier, living at Hucknall under Huthwaite, said he had worked at the Hucknall pit for two or three years. He knew the deceased, and worked under him to repair the roadways. They were at work on Thursday last in No. 29 return airway, having gone there about eight o’ clock to “rip” a piece of roof. The airway was about a yard in height and five yards in width, and led between two working places. Witness had a naked light and deceased a safety lamp. The roof was supported by a prop on each side of a cross bar. There was another prop about half a yard further on, and these were removed in order to get the “stuff” down to make the road higher. They forced all the “stuff” they could down and witness suggested they should go to the other end whilst that settled. They went and “ripped” about three yards down to the height and width they wanted. Returning they found a piece required cutting to let the other part down. Deceased examined it several times and pronounced it safe. He was kneeling down using a pick and witness holding a light when over a ton of bind from the left hand side came down without any warning and crushed the deceased against the side. He was killed immediately. Witness went for assistance and the body was extricated. The jury returned a verdict of. “Accidental death”.


Nottinghamshire Guardian - Friday 26 February 1886

memory

The District Coroner, Mr. D. Whittingham held an inquest on Monday on the bodies of Richard Rudd, and Isaac Hayes, who met with their deaths whilst engaged at the New Hucknall Colliery, near Mansfield, on Friday last. Mr. Stokes, assistant Government inspector was present, and Mr. S. Watson. Colliery manager represented the Colliery Company. Evidence as to the identification of Hayes was first given at the Rifleman Inn, Sutton in Ashfield, the widow stating he was forty three years of age. He had worked at the Hucknall Colliery between two and three years, but had never previously met with an accident there. The jury afterwards proceeded to the Portland Arms, Hucknall under Huthwaite, where the enquiry continued. Ann Rudd deposing that Richard Rudd was her husband, He was thirty three years of age, was a “datler” or roadman at the New Hucknall Colliery, where he was fatally injured. Thomas Robinson, Westbourne Terrace, Sutton in Ashfield, stated that he knew the deceased and had worked with them. Last Friday evening about a quarter past seven, he went with Thomas Harrison to pull down a door in No, 12 gate, near the No.43 level roadway. He afterwards assisted the deceased Hayes to get some “side” off a roadway. Harrison was over witness and he obeyed his instructions. When they went to the place there was one sprag at the side. They pulled off all the loose bits from No. 43 level side, and commenced “holing”. Witness got about an inch under when deceased Rudd came up to start work. Before commencing he fetched a prop to put under the side. But it was not being sufficiently tight it did not fit. Witness shouted “hold on “and cut the sharp edge off the side of the road. Whilst Rudd was setting the prop the side of the road came out. Witness was knocked backwards, and when he got up again he found that a large amount of stuff had come down, and that Rudd and Hayes had been killed. Witness left the pit, and did not see the bodies recovered. Thomas Harrison deposed that he had worked as a “datler” at the New Hucknall Colliery for five years, and was engaged there on Friday evening, with the deceased men and the last witness. It was Hayes duty to see that the place was safe, and not witnesses. Whilst they were at work Edward Blood, the deputy came up, and told Hayes that the place would look more comfortable if they had more timber. There was only one prop, and this was set at the by Hayes to protect himself. Had the place been properly “spraged” according to the rules the piece would not have come down until the sprags were removed. There was plenty of timber for use. Edward Blood said he was night chargeman at the colliery and had superintendence of the work. On Friday evening, about six o’ clock, witness told Hayes that the “side” in question wanted getting off. They examined the place, and it appeared perfectly safe. There was one “stretcher” across the road at the thick end of the side supporting it. It would be 6ft. by 8ft. The roof was coal, and the side was “clunch”. Witness went away, and on returning at half past six to give further instructions he found that the stretcher had been taken out and there was nothing supporting the side. Witness directed Hayes to again set the “stretcher” and also set props so as to make the place secure. It was usual to set “sprags” before commencing work of that kind. Witness visited the place again about eight o’ clock and found that Hayes had not set the “Stretcher” as he had been instructed. Witness remarked to him that he wanted more timber to the side for safety, and he said “I can’t see that it will take any harm, it is as hard as iron”. He again remarked that that it would be more comfortable with more timber, and sent Rudd for a prop to be set. He was in the act of setting it when the side came out. Witness had turned his back and was six or seven yards away when the fall took place. The quantity of the stuff which came down was twelve or fifteen tons. The Coroner having reviewed the evidence at some length, the jury returned a verdict of ”Accidental death”