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Calendar
The Decline Of The Industry Continued
After Nationalisation 1947

Book 6
Chimneys
1987
1989

1987 Pages   1     2     3    4    5     6     7     8     9     10     11 

Newstead Closed 1987 After 113 Years

(Continued)

The shaft was measured in 1957 using a wire and in 1984 checked using a Wild Autoplumb and Aga Geodimeter.

M15 was the first Retreat panel in High Main in 1974-1975. The shafts at 13 feet (3.96m) dia sunk 500 yards (457m) to Top Hard were filled to the High main level in 1976. The Becorit road-railer system was used for supplies.

The Bowwater-Scott paper mill closed at Ellesmere Port with a loss of orders amounting to 200,000 tonnes a year.

The photo shows a bank of switches near a lip at a typical loader gate as at many collieries.

There were times when there was unrest. The pit boys rebelled in Sep 1892 over a price list by wanting similar or same as at the neighbouring mines where at 12 years of age boys were getting 1s 2d (6p) per shift rising to 3s 8d (19p) at 19 years of age.

The boys again went on strike in Oct 1900 over a further price list that pertained to the Leen Valley pits. The Nottinghamshire Miners Association then negotiated a uniform wage for all the boys in the Leen Valley. However in July 1902 wages were reduced when the 1888 percentage went down from 60% to 50% and again all the boys came out on strike at the pits for a week and brought them to a standstill.

There was further strike by the men at the pit lasting 2 months from May 1906 following a ballot over non-unionists. The boys came out on strike again in July 1909 over snap time. This strike spread throughout the Midlands and South Yorkshire. The shift times set by Act of parliament was 8 hours but the lads were told there was no recognised snap time and they were to eat their bread when it was convenient to do so, i.e. when the tubs were standing etc. The NMA eventually succeeded in getting a 20 minutes snap time. In 1943 Sidney Page a surface worker was told to go underground to work under the Wartime Regulations. However he refused to do so and was sent to jail. The Newstead men came out in sympathy on 13th Sep 1943 and other pits joined them. They vowed to stay out on strike whilst ever Page was imprisoned. Page was eventually persuaded by the union to accept the decision to go underground and he did so providing his surface job was available after the hostilities. The men went back to work on 19th Sep 1943 following Page’s release.

In 1983 the last High Main face finished and the seam was abandoned due to increasing dirt content. At that time the coal preparation plant was closed and all production was transported to Bentinck washery by road. A drift from Newstead pit bottom some 1,422 yards (1,300m) long connected Annesley and Bentinck Waterloo some 220 yards (200m) below completed in 1985, when conveyor belts some 2,190 yards (2,000m) long transported coal to Bentinck coal prep plant and the surface road transport ceased in March 1985.

A 215 tonnes capacity Butterley bunker was situated at the top of the Tupton drifts and the through put was in the region of 610 tonnes an hour. However the Tupton seam started in 1977 was abandoned in 1986 due to severe geological problems on faces and roadway crush, water and interaction from other seams caused problems. Similar geological problems in the High Hazels seam were experienced.

Diesel locos were used for materials handling and endless rope haulage some 1,800m long in each drift.

A new drivage was driven from the pit bottom to the top of the drifts in 1982 when a rope hauled manrider was installed.

Entry into the Low Bright seam was not thought viable. Poor conditions and water had forced the premature closure of the Tupton seam and production from the High Hazles limited. Men would have had to have been transferred temporarily whilst the new seam was developed.

The union requested a ballot to decide the pit’s future. After a vote by 500 men the verdict was to accept the enhanced redundancy terms and for a few, the transfer to other collieries.

Part of No4 Area NCB at 1947, then South Nottinghamshire Area in 1967. There was a connection via a 1in6 drift to Top Hard roadway leading to Annesley DC shaft and linked to Bentinck 1984. There was a connection to Kirkby also and water from Kirkby was flowing into Newstead High Main from 1984 at about 50 g.p.m. (gallons per minute).

In September 1986 development of the Low Bright seam was discussed, but whilst this seam was accessed, miners from Newstead would have to be temporarily transferred to neighbouring pits, however the unions then requested a ballot to decide the future of the colliery. This ballot showed an overall majority (137 for and 111 against) of the 500 workforce in favour of closing the pit, which was now 113 years old.

The reserves were transferred to Annesley, the older men were given chance of redundancy on offer for a limited period and the younger men given the opportunity to move to a longer life collier, and Newstead was closed on 19th March 1987.

The shafts were filled with graded limestone chippings and capped with concrete. On Sunday 7th February 1988 the headgear was toppled by explosives.


  • 1894: Top Hard 1,173, s/f 271, total 1,444
  • 1895: 1,473 men
  • 1896: 1,180 TH, 281 s/f
  • 1897: 1,172 TH, 277 s/f
  • 1898: 1,203 TH, 283 s/f
  • 1899: 1,241 TH, 281 s/f
  • 1900: 1,297 TH, 288 s/f, 1,585 men
  • 1901: 1,279 TH, 275 s/f
  • 1902: 1,343 TH, 261 s/f
  • 1903: 1,342 TH, 290 s/f, 1,632 men
  • 1904: 1,346 TH, 294 s/f
  • 1905: 1,272 TH, 279 s/f, 1,551 men
  • 1906: 1,326 TH, 280 s/f
  • 1907: 1,351 TH, 311 s/f
  • 1908: 1,283 TH, 305 s/f
  • 1909: 1,342 TH, 327 s/f
  • 1910: 1,342 TH, 325 s/f
  • 1911: 1,342 TH, 323 s/f, 1,665 men
  • 1912: 1,338 TH, 344 s/f
  • 1913: 1,346 TH, 340 s/f, 1,686 men
  • 1914: 1,330 TH, 347 s/f
  • 1915: 1,153 TH, 344 s/f, 1,497 men
  • 1916: 1,218 TH, 368 s/f
  • 1917: 1,214 TH, 372 s/f
  • 1918: 1,197 TH, 362 s/f
  • 1919: 1,338 TH, 410 s/f
  • 1920: 1,269 TH, 416 s/f, 1,685 men
  • 1921: 1,195 TH, 398 s/f
  • 1922: 1,233 TH, 409 s/f
  • 1923: 1,182 TH, 427 s/f, 1,609 men
  • 1924: 1,350 TH, 420 s/f
  • 1925: 1,413 TH, 393 s/f, 1,806 men
  • 1926: 1,427 Top Hard, 486 s/f, total 1,913 men (max)
  • 1927: 1,338 TH, 392 s/f, 1,730 men
  • 1928: 1,333 TH, 342 s/f, 1,675 men
  • 1929: 1,348 TH, 356 s/f, 1,704 men
  • 1930: 1,356 TH, 357 s/f, 1,713 men
  • 1931: 1,434 TH, 348 s/f, 1932: 1,491 TH, 343 s/f
  • 1933: 983 TH, 260 s/f, 1,243 men
  • 1934: 1,017 TH, 211 s/f
  • 1935: 841 TH, 301 s/f, 1,142 men
  • 1936: 840 TH, 291 s/f
  • 1937: 916 TH, 296 s/f
  • 1938: 934 TH, 302 s/f
  • 1939: 935 app TH, 310 s/f
  • 1940: 940 Top Hard & Dunsil, 319 s/f, total 1,259 men
  • 1941: 963 Top Hard only again, 351 s/f
  • 1942: 987 TH, 400 s/f
  • 1943: 981 TH. 413 s/f
  • 1944: 1,076 Top Hard & High Hazel, 411 s/f
  • 1945: 983 TH & H H, s/f 362, total 1,345 men
  • 1946: 468,000 tons, 1,294 men and boys.

Tonnage & Manpower NCB: No4 Area EMD:

  • 1947: 466,954 tons, 954 TH, HH, Dunsil, 381 s/f, 1,294 men ave
  • 1948: 460,862 tons, Top Hard, Dunsil & High Hazel, 1,283 men
  • 1949: 478,526 tons, 1,264 men
  • 1950: High Main, High Hazel, Top Hard and Dunsil 490,090 tons, 1,279 men
  • 1951: TH, HH and HM 507,409 tons, 1,311 men
  • 1952: 508,372 tons, 1,350 men
  • 1953: Top Hard, High Main 495,437 tons, 1,333 men
  • 1954: 618,385 tons, 1,257 men
  • 1955: Top Hard fin, 673,212 tons, 1,255 men
  • 1956: High Main 791,142 tons, 1,269 men
  • 1957: 967,494 tons, 1,267 men
  • 1958: 936,551 tons, 1,295 men
  • 1959: 1,034,959 tons, 1,280 men
  • 1960: 1,006,843 tons, 1,244 men
  • 1961: 1,053,562 tons, 1,231 men
  • 1962: 1,175,709 tons, 1,258 men
  • 1963: 1,184,197 tons, 1,233 men
  • 1963/64: 1,124,614 tons, 1,224 men
  • 1964/65: 1,040,831 tons, 1,208 men
  • 1965/66: 1,090,557 tons, 1,222 men
  • 1966/67: 1,285,461 tons max, 1,230 men

South Nottinghamshire Area:

  • 1967/68: 1,188,468 tons, 1,304 men
  • 1968/69: 1,184,786 tons, 1,316 men
  • 1969/70: 1,266,826 tons, 1,315 men
  • 1970/71: 1,252,176 tons, 1,341 men
  • 1971/72: 992,394 tons, 1,445 men
  • 1972/73: 1,050,477 tons, 1,260 HM, 188 s/f, 1,448 men max
  • 1973/74: 855,959 tons, 1,404 men
  • 1974/75: 1,056,885 tons, 1,403 men
  • 1975/76: 1,095,105 tons, 1,430 men
  • 1976/77: 886,040 tons, 1,408 men
  • 1977/78: 663,677 tonnes, (653,193 tons), 1,430 men
  • 1978/79: 686,569 tonnes, 1,426 men
  • 1979/80: 631,338 tonnes, 1,421 men
  • 1980/81: 687,760 tonnes, 1,410 men
  • 1981/82: 615,427 tonnes, 1,374 men
  • 1982/83: 622,760 tonnes, 1,317 men
  • 1983/84: 343,346 tonnes, 1,113 men
  • 1984/85: 432,613 tonnes, 847 men
  • 1985/86: 426,640 tonnes, 776 men