Banner
Information and photographs submitted by subscribers are posted in good faith. If any copyright of anyone else's material is unintentionally breached, please email me



Calendar
The Decline Of The Industry Continued
After Nationalisation 1947

Book 6
Chimneys
1988
1990

1988 Pages   1     2     3     4     5     6     7     8     9     10     11     12  

1988 - Page 9


Bentinck Merged With Annesley

Bentinck Colliery (Nottinghamshire) (locally referred to as Bentick) sunk in 1895-1896 by the New Hucknall Colliery Co to the south west of Kirkby and to the east of Langton ceased production from the Waterloo seam and as a separate unit after 92 years and was merged with Annesley in March 1988, and renamed Annesley Bentinck mine.

The pits had been connected underground 1980-1981.

Shaft positions: 116m above sea level, SK45SE, 495 yards (452m) deep.

  • Bentinck No1 DC shaft 448740, 354963, 4.7m dia
  • Waterloo at 223m
  • Deep Hard at 348m
  • No2 UC shaft 448769, 354969, 462m to Blackshale and used for winding men and materials to Waterloo and Tupton faces
  • No3 DC shaft 448799, 354974, sunk to Threequarter horizon at 414m and used for winding men and materials.

Cutters were installed in the Low Main workings in 1920 and by 1923 conveyors also and subsequently in the Deep Soft and Deep Hard by 1930.

Surface plant was changed from steam driven and compressed air to electric in 1931.

Haulages were converted underground by 1937. However compressed air driven cutters were installed in 1938 and changed to electric in 1943.

Workmen were transported home after work via open topped ‘charabancs’ in 1920s.

A canteen and pithead baths were opened in 1936 and a new canteen was opened in 1946.

Prior to nationalisation in January 1947 the colliery was owned by the amalgamation of New Hucknall Colliery Co and Blackwell Colliery Co, named NH and B Collieries Ltd in 1944.

A new coal preparation plant operational in 1968 was at Bentinck and capable of 800 tons per hour and all the coal from the two pits was exited via Bentinck surface drift (started from surface June 1964 at 1in4 for 2,200 yards (2,012m) down to the Blackshale workings, thirling in May 1967) and continued to do so until Annesley producing from the Blackshale seam was closed.

The drift intersected the Waterloo and Tupton workings. The Cementation Co had the contract to drive the drift and according to one of the headers, a holiday acquaintance Andy Steven (a Highlander as he referred to himself, not a Scotsman) who worked in the drift in the late 1960s, Micky Magner was the ruthless Irish shift boss in charge. Others in his team were Hungarians (who came to this country after the uprising in 1956 and hardly spoke any English). They were Zoltan Arkovitch, Charlie Dasas and Louis Kovaks the ‘spanner man’ aged in his 70s and ‘Dirty Dick’ Digman.

‘Dirty Dick’ wore a cheap suit that he had made for him every 6 weeks by a Jewish tailor in Mansfield (probably Jelonek). He wore the suit all the time until it became unfit to wear. He used to dash through the showers in his wellies and some clothing hardly getting wet, hence his nickname, and according to Andy he even wore the suit in bed in the digs in Mansfield where they stayed.

The work was ultimate graft and the firm tolerated no slackers or minor accident cases or they were replaced.

On several occasions the team drilled and fired two pulls of 6 feet (1.80m), loaded out using a big Eimco shovel and set 4 arches in a shift earning them £120 for the week. Similarly advances were made on the other shifts. This was a terrific amount of pay at that time and the NUM officials tried to stop it as they felt it wrong for their members to supply them but of course it was a private contract with no union and no one in the NUM so nothing could be done. Miners at the pit were probably getting about 25.

Drift mouth co-ordinates 43/4855/982060. It was part-filled and capped April 2000.

No2 head bunker was installed in 1973 and wagon controllers beneath the hopper.

Gullick 6/240 chocks were installed underground in 1975. A loading machine was installed on the surface in 1980.


Sinking Details:
Start Excavating 1894 By The Company

  • 21 Sep 1894 soil 1’ 0” (0.3m ), clay 4’ 4” (1.32m), bind 11’ 8” (3.55m), fireclay 3’ 4” (1.02m) 6 yds 2’ 4” (6.20m), curb 11 yards (10.0m) No10, bat or smithies coal 1’ 8” (0.50m) @ 14 yards (12.8m)
  • 19 Sep 1894 Began sinking by Kellam and Watford, first metal curb @ 50 yards (45.7m), coal 9” (0.23m) @ 29 yds 11” (27.3m), bat or smutty coal 1’ 0” (0.30m) @ 33 yds 2’ 8” (32.6m) 25/9/1894
  • Restart 13th Dec 1894 cannel 1’ 4” (0.40m) @ 56 yds 1’ 3” (51.5m)
  • 9 Jan 1895, coal 8” (0.20m) @ 63 yds 1’ 3” (58.0m), coal smutty 3’ 3” (1.0m) @ 74 yds (67.7m) on
  • 23 Jan 1895, coal smutty 5” (0.13m) @ 76 yds 9” (70.2m), coal 8” (0.20m) @ 101 yds 1’ 2” (93.4m)
  • 23 Mar 1895, bright coal 2’ 0” (0.61m) @ 114 yds (104.2m)
  • 1 Apr 1895, coal 8” (0.20m) @ 134 yds 2’ 3” (124.6m) 22/4/95, coal 6” (0.15m) sutty @ 139 yds (127.1m) 25/4/95, coal 2” (0.05m) @ 155 yds (141.7m) 13/5/95, wooden bricking curb 4” (0.10m) @ 162 yds 2’ 0” (150m) 16/5/95, smutty coal 1” (0.025m) @ 168 yds 1’ 1” (154.6m)
  • 20 May 1895, 5th wooden curb 12” (0.30m), bright coal 6” (0.15m) @ 188 yds 1’ 0” (172.2m)
  • 12 Jun 1895, Combe coal 1’ 4” (0.40m) @ 189 yds 2’ 5” (175m) 12/6/95, Butterley Top Hard hollows (gob or goaf) 2’ 2” (0.66m) @ 190 yds 10” (174.5m)
  • 13 Jun 1895, total of 100 strata, bright coal 3” (0.076m) @ 200 yds (182.9m)
  • 26 Jun 1895, Dunsil seam 2’ 0” (0.61m) @ 209 yds 1’ 9” (192.7m), 3/7/95, hard coal 1’ 7” (0.48m) @ 226 yds 9” (207.3m)
  • 12 Jul 1895, soft coal 1’ 2” (0.36m) @ 230 yds (210.3m)
  • 13 Jul 1895, cannel coal 2’ 1” (0.63m) @ 239 yds
  • 18 Jul 1895, Waterloo seam 1’ 10” (0.56m) @ 246 yds 2’ 11” (227.6m)
  • 27 Jul 1895, coal 1’ 9” (0.53m) @ 256 yds (234m) 1/8/95, coal 2” (0.05m) @ 256 yds 2’ 11” (236.75m), coal 1” @ 257 yds 9” (235.2m)
  • 3 Aug 1895, coal 3” (0.075m) @ 262 yds 1’ 0” (240m)
  • 6 Aug 1895, 5th wooden curb 12” (0.30m) @ 273 yds (249.6m) 16/8/95, cockle bed 1” (0.025m) @ 296 yds 9” (270.9m)
  • 3 Sep 1895, 6th wooden curb 12” (0.30m) @ 297 yds 2’ 6” (272.3m) 4/9/95, soft coal 1’ 8” (0.51m) @ 298 yds 1’ 1” (273.5m)
  • 4 Sep 1895, 7th wooden curb @316 yds (289m)
  • 13 Sep 1895, coal 1” (0.025m) @ 330 yds 2’ 0” (302.4m)
  • 24 Sep 1895, 8th wooden curb @ 332 yds (303.6m)
  • 30 Sep 1895, coal 5” @ 338 yds 1’ 3” (309.5m) 3/10/95, coal 3” (0.076m) @ 340 yds 2’ 0” (311.5m)
  • 4 Oct 1895, 9th wooden curb @ 349 yds (319.1m)
  • 11 Oct 1895, coal 9” (0.23m) @ 350 yds 8” (320.6m)
  • 15 Oct 1895, Deep Soft seam 3’ 9” (1.14m) @ 362 yds 1’ 5 “ (332.3m)
  • 21 Oct 1895, 203 layers of strata, 10th wooden curb @ 366 yds 1’ 10” (336.3m)
  • 23 Oct 1895, hard coal 9” (0.23m) @ 374 yds 11” (342.8m), Rattlejack Gee coal 1” (0.025m) @ 380 yds 1’ 4” (348.7m)
  • 19 Nov 1895, Deep Hard seam 2’ 4” (0.71m) @ 381 yds 8” (349m), 11th wooden curb @ 383 yds 1’ 10” (351.9m)
  • 26 Nov 1895, Piper seam soft coal 1’ 2” (0.36m) @ 390 yds 1’ 3” (357m), 224 layers of strata, 394 yds (360.3m) deep
  • 30 Nov 1895, 400 yds (365.75m) deep
  • 8 Jan 1896, 13th wooden curb @ 422 yds (385.9m)
  • 13 an 1896, cockle bed 9” (0.23m) @ 430 yds 1’ 7” (394.6m), cockle bed 3” (0.075m) @ 433 yds 1’ 2” (397m), 14th wooden curb @ 437 yds (399.7m), dark bind with cockles 2’ 0” (0.61m) @ 437 yds 2’ 10” (402.2m), batty coal 11” (0.28m) @ 438 yds 9” (400.7m), Low Main seam 3’ 0” (0.91m) and 4” bat (0.10m) @ 441 yds 3” (403.3m)
  • 21 Feb 1896, coal 1’ 11” (0.58m) @ 444 yds 1’ 10” (407.65m)
  • 25 Feb 1896, 15th wooden curb @ 448 yds 1’ 2” (410.7m)
  • 28 Feb 1896, stood
  • 6 May 1896 Recommenced sinking, soft coal 2’ 4” (0.71m) @470 yds 1’ 4” (430.15m), Blackshale seam coal 1’ 4“, (0.42m) dirt 2” (0.05m) coal 8” (0.20m), dirt 4” (0.11m), coal 1’ 2” (0.36m) @ 495 yds (452.6m)
  • 2 Jul 1896 finished sinking @ 508 yds 7” (465m)

Seams worked at Bentinck:

  • Deep Soft, 3ft 9in (1.66m) 1905-1956
  • Deep Hard (dark blue bind 2”, black bind 3”, Jay coal 1”, coal 2’ 6”, black bat 3”, clunch floor using No2 and No3 shafts 382 yds (349m) via stone drifts from Deep Soft -2nd July 1901 and -1967
  • Low Main or Tupton cannel 3”, bright coal 2’ 9”, hard batty coal 3”, strong clunch floor 1895 - 6th Aug 1896 (pit bottom headings) and - 25th Mar 1983
  • 2nd Waterloo 1907-1988, and Blackshale (using Low Main shaft 442 yds (404m) dirt 4”, coal 1’ 1”, dirt 1”, coal 10”, dirt 1”, coal 6”, dirt 1”, coal 8” -2nd July 1901 and 1988 (cont’d at Annesley).

Connections were made to Langton, Brookhill in Aug 1968 (then the shaft filled) and Newstead later.

Dirt was transported from the Coal Preparation Plant to the dirt tip by 42” (1.07m) wide conveyor to a 100 tons capacity bunker and also one of 400 tons from where it was transported up the tip by 36” (0.91m) wide conveyor to be spread by bulldozer and 2 Euclid TS24 scrapers, 20 hours per day.

Rapid loading bunker commissioned 1980 and Coal Prep Plant cost £6m.

The 3 shafts at Bentinck as per New Hucknall had been sunk at 14 feet (4.27m) dia, No1 to Deep Hard at 381 yards (348m), No2 to Blackshale at 505 yards (462m) and No3 to Threequarter seam at 453 yards (414m), this shaft using a Grange Iron Co engine to June 1977.

2 new identical Aerex 9 feet (2.795m) dia single inlet with backward angle bladed radial fans and 1,600hp motors at 735 rpm at No2 shaft top, installed 1973. At Langton the 11’ 3” (3.43m) single bladed inlet backward radial fan installed in 1959, also booster fans at UC shaft. Electrification of the three winding engines was completed in Dec 1978.

A Training centre for new entrants into the industry for some of the pits in Nottinghamshire opened after 1947. A new larger training centre was established in 1965.

Surface locos on 4’ 8” gauge were side tank engines

  • No2, 0-6-0 1893
  • No3 Jubilee 0-6-0 1897
  • New Hucknall No4, 0-6-0, 1905
  • Huthwaite 7, 0-6-0 1917, 0-6-0, 1917
  • Bentinck No1, 0-4-0, 1900
  • Bentinck No2, 0-6-0, 1931
  • Bentinck No3, 0-6-0, 1928
  • LNER 985, 0-4-0, 1923
  • EMFOUR 3, 0-6-0, 1954, 0-4-0 diesel 1958
  • Annesley No2, 0-6-0, 1937
  • Daisy 0-4-0, 1906, 0-4-0, 1966
  • EMFOUR 9, 0-6-0 1958.

Bentinck Training Centre for underground loco personnel 2’ 0” gauge were 0-6-0 diesel 1953, No3, 4 wheel diesel 1980, No4, 4 wheel diesel 1979, 4 wheel diesel 1984 and Tracey 4 wheel-4 wheel bo-bo 1987.

The first pinwheel system shearer in the 6’ 9” (2.06m) thick Blackshale seam installed Mar 1975, worked July 1975-Sep 1978. Roof bolting was implemented at 50sA Supply gate, using a TMT220 machine in 1986.

In August 1987, K50As Blackshale face with Gullick Dobson 4 x 250 shield supports and shearer produced 17,895 tonnes in the week. Bentinck produced the fastest 1 million tons in 7 months to break the European record and Lord Robens Chairman of the NCB visited the pit to congratulate the men. Later a record 45,429 saleable tonnes was produced in one week. A profit of £23m was made that year.

My first visit underground at Bentinck was in 1963 / 1964 when I took my Deputy’s practical examination on 22s panel in the 2nd Waterloo seam. Having had experience in the 1st Waterloo at Teversal where sometimes the conditions were diabolical, the 2nd Waterloo seam at Bentinck had very good conditions as I remember.

Reclamation of the tips continued and some parts were able to be returned back to the tenant farmers as can be seen.